India has one of the most thorough provisions of Animal Welfare Legislation in the world. There are sets of principles administering our utilization and treatment of both household and wild animals. Introduction The earth which is a natural habitat for the Humans and Animals is governed through a system of the cycle, where each creature irrespective of big… Read More »

India has one of the most thorough provisions of Animal Welfare Legislation in the world. There are sets of principles administering our utilization and treatment of both household and wild animals.

Introduction

The earth which is a natural habitat for the Humans and Animals is governed through a system of the cycle, where each creature irrespective of big or little is having its commitment in keeping up the cycle thereon for the functioning of the ecosystem.

In the event that any of such living beings have been extinct or made to disappear, it might result in causing lop-sidedness in nature. The quick decay and vanishing of a tremendous number of animals is a grave concern throughout the planet. There are numerous types of animals which are not any more existing on this planet or they’re nearly peril.

The Wild Birds and Animals Protection Act 1912 passed by the British Government in the year 1912 reverberated the peril with the object of ensuring the life of imperilled species of Wild Birds and Animals.[1]

In any case, this Act couldn’t turn out to be so workable. Other than this Act the different state laws which were enacted in India post-independence were additionally discovered ineffectual as far as its usage. Such insufficient and outdated laws were seen as supplanted by some successful uniform law so as to secure the extinct wild species of Animals.

Animal Rights and the Constitution of India

As per the Constitution of India, protection of wildlife is a state subject. Still, the Government of India in the wake of criticalness and felt it progressively basic to have its own enactment Governing the whole Nation with a uniform law. Because of the limitation of being a State subject the main way out for the parliament to have its very own enactment was under Article 252 of the Constitution.

Implementing the authority under this article numerous States[2] of our nation passed” various acts with approval of Central Government. Therefore, the Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972 was enacted by the Legislature.

The reason behind the enactment was basically related to the protection of Wild Animals, Birds, and Plants and for issues related with them or subordinate or accidental thereto. Be that as it may, this target has been broken because of certain provisos in the framework.

Basic entitlements for Animals are secured under the Constitution of India, under Article 51A(G) which makes it an essential obligation upon each citizen of India to protect wildlife and have empathy for every single living animal.

As indicated under Article 48, the State has the obligation to sort out farming and animal husbandry on present-day, logical lines and to make strides for saving and improving breeds, restricting butcher of bovines and calves and other milch and draft dairy cattle. It likewise gives that the State additionally has an obligation to secure, defend and improve the backwoods and wildlife of the nation.

Laws in India

There are numerous laws for the protection and preservation of Animals in India.

  1. The Prevention of Cruelty To Animals Act, 1960

As this act is enacted by the Union Government, it is enforceable through the region of India except if indicated something else. It applies just to “hostage” and “residential” animals. Section 11 (1) (a) to (o) of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 endorses and specifies the types of cruelty.

If any creature is exposed to any type of savagery indicated treated in any coldblooded way, in any of the ways given under Section 11 (a) to (o) of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960, the offender (on account of a first offence) should pay fine which will stretch out to fifty rupees and in the event that it is the situation of second offence or ensuing offence committed within three years of the past offence, he will be fined with at least twenty-five rupees yet which may reach out to one hundred rupees or with the imprisonment for a term which may stretch out to three months or with both.

Section 34 of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 gives the general intensity of seizure for assessment to the police officer over the position of constable. If the police officer comes to think about the commission of any offence under PCA Act has been committed or is been committed on any animal, he can seize the animal and produce the equivalent for assessment by the nearest magistrate or by the Veterinary Officer.

Section 35 states that the animals are to be detained and have to be produced before the magistrate. Animals are to be dealt with ought most to care and nurse in a hospital, until they are fit for release. The animals sent for care and treatment to a hospital can’t be discharged from such places except if the veterinary officer gives the testament of its qualification for release. The expense of moving the animal to a hospital and its upkeep and treatment in a clinic must be paid by the owner of the animal.

  1. The Performing Animals Rules, 1973 And The Performing Animals (Registration) Rules, 2001

Under Section 2(b), of the Performing Animals Rules, 1973, Performing Animals implies any animal which is utilized with the end goal of any excitement to which the public is conceded through the sale of tickets. Sec. 2(h) of the Performing Animals (Registration) Rules, 2001 indicates this incorporates animals utilized in movies and for equine events to which the public are admitted.

Section 22 of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1960 curtails the training and exhibition of performing animals, except if the individual keen on training and exhibiting the animal is enlisted as per arrangements of the Act. No animal can be trained or exhibited, where the Central Government, by warning in the Official Gazette, has limited the training and exhibition of such animal. The animals who can’t be trained or exhibited are-

  • Lions
  • Panthers
  • Tigers
  • Monkeys
  • Bears

The most important condition is the enlistment of the individual looking for consent for training and exhibition. Section 3 of The Performing Animals (Registration) Rules, 2001, accommodates Application of enrolment expressing that any individual envious of training or exhibiting performing animals needs to apply for enlistment to the endorsed authority. Without being enlisted such an individual isn’t permitted to display or train any animal as a performing animal.

Apart from this, Section 8 of The Performing Animals (Registration) Rules, 2001 provides general conditions for enrolment, which the appropriate authority while providing registration may force such terms and conditions.[3]

Offences

Section 26 of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 records the offences with respect to performing animals. Circumstances, where it can be applicable to an individual, are as under-

  1. Not being enrolled exhibits or trains any performing animal; or Being enlisted under this Act, exhibits or trains any performing animal as for which, or in a way regarding which, he isn’t enrolled.
  2. Exhibits or trains as a performing animal, any animal which isn’t to be utilized for the purpose of exhibition.
  3. Obstructs or Wilfully defers any individual or police officers from accessing and examining the premises where the performing animals are kept”
  4. Concealing animals with the intention of keeping away from such investigation.

Any individual found guilty of such offences will be punished with fine which may reach out to 500 rupees, or with imprisonment which may extend to three months or with both. The animal will be seized and the individual won’t be permitted to keep an animal once more.

Section 27 of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animal Acts, 1960 acts as an exclusion proviso. It provides for training of animals for bonafide military or police purposes. Section 11 of The Prevention of Cruelty to Animal Acts, 1960 applies to those animals as well. It must be remembered that no animals can be treated brutally or” to such an extent that harms or damages them.

  1. The Prevention of Cruelty To Draught And Pack Animals Rules, 1965

Section 6 of The Prevention of Cruelty to Draught and Pack Animals Rules, 1965, sets out the general conditions for the utilization of draft and pack animals. No individual is allowed to use any animal for drawing any vehicle or carrying on any load: –

  • For a normal of more than nine hours in a day;
  • For over five hours constantly without a break or rest for the animal;
  • In any territory where the temperature surpasses 37-degree C (99-degree F) during the period between 12 p.m. and 3 p.m. This implies it is unlawful to utilize draft and pack animals in North India, Chennai and every single other spot where the temperature remains routinely over 40 degrees Celsius in summer.

Section 11 of the Act, provides that if a police officer over the position of a constable feels that the animal is over-burdening, he may ask the owner or some other individual responsible for such animal to take the animal or the vehicle or both to the weighbridge for the reason for deciding the heaviness of the load which animal has been or is drawing or conveying.

And if the owner responsible for the aforesaid animal won’t agree to the demand of the police officer, the police officer has an option to take the animal or the vehicle or both to the weighbridge and get it weighted. And when any weight is resolved under this standard, the owner or other individuals responsible for the said animal will be given a receipt marked by the police officer with regards to the weight and some other information significant, as per law.

  1. The Transport of Animals Rules, 1978

Section 98 of The Transport of Animals Rules, 1978 lays down the general conditions for the transport of animals.

  • Animals to be transported shall be healthy and in good condition. They should be examined by a veterinary doctor for any kind of infectious diseases and their fitness to undertake the journey, provided that the nature and duration of the proposed journey shall be taken into account while determining the degree of fitness.
  • An animal which is unfit for transport shall not be transported and the animals that are newborn, diseased, blind, emaciated, lame, and fatigued or having given birth during the preceding seventy-two hours or likely to give birth during transport shall not be transported.
  • Pregnant and very young animals shall not be mixed with other animals during transport.
  • Different classes of animals shall be kept separately during the transport
  • Diseased animals, whenever transported for treatment, shall not be mixed with other animals.
  1. The Prevention of Cruelty To Animals (Slaughter House) Rules, 2001

There are standards given under The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960 specifically Slaughter House Rules, 2001. Section 2(c) defines ‘slaughterhouse’ as a place wherein 10 or more than 10 animals are butchered every day and is appropriately authorized or recognized under a Central, State or Provincial Act or any other statutory provisions.

Section 3(1) of the above mentioned Act gives that animals can’t be slaughtered aside from in a registered and authorized butcher house.

Section 3(2), “prohibits slaughtering of any animal

  • which is pregnant or
  • has an offspring less than three months old, or”
  • the animal which is younger than three months or
  • which has not been ensured by a Veterinary Doctor that it is in a fit condition to be butchered.

At any place, if there is a Government slaughterhouse, slaughter cannot be done at anyplace else. On the off chance that there is no government slaughterhouse here, at that point slaughter can just happen in an authorized slaughterhouse, which should be situated far from the public outreach or hazardous place.

These slaughterhouses need to adhere to all Municipal laws and the ISI guidelines. No animals can be butchered in slums, in roadside meat shops or in dhabas or at private houses. The butchering of any animal anywhere other than authorized slaughterhouse is prohibited, as it may cause a public nuisance.

Section 4 (1) to (8) lays down the essential requirements for the functioning of Slaughterhouse, which are as follows-

  • The slaughterhouse will have a room as a separate room with adequate size for veterinary inspection.
  • The veterinary doctor will issue a certificate of fitness for each and every animal inspected.
  • The veterinary doctor should thoroughly inspect not more than 12 animals in an hour and not more than 96 animals in a day.
  • The reception room of slaughterhouse will have appropriate slopes for direct emptying of animals from vehicles or railroad wagons and the said area should be equipped with water and feeding of animals.
  • Animals suffering from any disease or ill health or any infection, sickness should be kept isolated. Where they will be provided with essential requirements.
  • Adequate areas for the keeping of animals shall be given in slaughterhouse according to the class of animals to be slaughtered.
  • Slaughterhouse should have a resting ground with shelters.
  • Ante-mortem (before death) and pen area should be paved with non- slippery concrete suitable to stand wear and tear by hooves, or brick. Appropriate drainage facility should be made at the pen area.
  1. The Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972

This Act was enacted under the provision of Article 252 to forestall the decrease of wild animals and birds. It denies the poaching of specific animals aside from the reason for education or scientific research. In regard to certain wild animals, a permit is made essential for their hunting.

It gives that a state government may proclaim any region to be a sanctuary or as a national park on the off chance that it thinks about that such territory is of sufficient biological, faunal, floral, geomorphological, characteristic or zoological significance for ensuring, engendering or growing wildlife or its condition.[4]

The above goal of the Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972, after certain long periods of its enforcement was made liable to focused assault by the influenced ones just as the improper gainers in future. This prompted different changes in the Parent Act at different interims of times.

  1. Prevention and Detection of Offences under the Wild Life Protection Act:

Anticipation and recognition of offences under the Wild Life Protection Act is the greatest test before the authorities under the Act. In spite of the fact that wide range of power has been given to different authorities so as to check the offences under the Act, still because of an absence of working standards and coordination of different authorities, the offences are expanding unabated.

Section 50 and 51 of the Act are giving the broad extension to the prevention, detection of offences the punishments thereto.[5]

  1. The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, 1960

The Act deals with the punishment for unnecessary torture on an animal and makes such pain and suffering a penal offence. Sub-section (3) of section 11 PCA says that it is the obligation of each individual owning an animal to take all sensible measure to guarantee the prosperity of such animal and to avert any kind of punishment, unnecessary pain or suffering.

The punishment under this Act is, the wrongdoer (on account of a first offence) should pay fine up to fifty rupees and in case of second offence or consequent offence within three years of the past offence, he will be fined with at least twenty-five rupees however which may extend to one hundred rupees or with the imprisonment for a term which may extend to three months or with both.

Additionally, on account of second offence, the offender’s vehicle will be seized, and he will never be permitted to keep an animal again.[6]

  1. Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972

This Act prohibits any kind of damages to any wild animal, which is termed as government property, under section 39. The meaning of an “animal” as defined in the Act incorporates creatures of amphibians, birds, reptiles and mammals and their offspring’s.

The eggs of both bird and reptiles are also included under the Act. Section 51 of the Act lays down the punishment for the offences under this Act. The accused, when found guilty will be liable with imprisonment for a term of three years or with a fine of twenty-five thousand rupees or with both. And on account of a second or subsequent offence, the term of imprisonment will be seven years with a fine of ten thousand rupees.

Laws Governing Dairy Sector In India

India being an agricultural country, the majority of the population depends on farming, cultivation, etc. Due to which they have domesticated livestock framework developed. The variety of animals are determined with the kinds of species raised, breeds, and nourishing practices, social insurance frameworks that are firmly connected to the regular flora and fauna, and neighbourhood marketing frameworks.

Dairy business in India is regulated by the Government of India through Milk and Milk Products Order 1992 (MMPO). In spite of the fact that the MMPO doesn’t have any substantive animal welfare or even husbandry provisions, the fact that it controls sanitary, cleanliness, quality and food safety conditions in dairies.

This consequence from the fact that for sterile, cleanliness, quality and sanitation arrangements determined in the MMPO, consideration regarding raising practices is basic. Like the MMPO, handling of meat items is also regulated under Meat Food Products Order, 1973 (MFPO), supervised by Ministry of Food Processing ventures with effect from March 2004.

The principle destinations of the MFPO, 1973 are:

  1. To direct production of meat food items through authorizing of manufacturers, enforce sterile and clean conditions recommended for the production of healthy meat nourishment items; Exercise exacting quality control at all phases of production of meat nourishment items, fish items including frozen poultry and so forth.
  2. To create a vital framework for the handling of meat and meat nourishment items for the residential market just as for Export showcase.

The Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MFPI) and the Ministry of Agriculture through the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries (DAHDF). The MFPI manages strategies concerning milk items, for example, esteem expansion and meat while the DAHDF manages milk creation.

There are foundations under PPP mode, who manage the dairy training and research, dairy advancement; milk items export advancement, examination, quality testing, affirmations, and so forth.[7]

Conclusion

In the event that appropriately utilized, the law can be your best weapon against animal misuse. India has one of the most thorough provisions of animal protection laws in the world. There are sets of principles administering our utilization and treatment of both household and wild animals. Despite the fact that there have been different laws and cases with respect to animal welfare, their protection and conservation, no usage of those laws have rendered mere a pointless exercise.

For the better and viable usage of these laws, government offices, as well as individuals, should approach and should assume the liability. Neglecting to do as such, we need to endure hopeless misfortune, which won’t be satisfied in any circumstance.


[1] Shyam Divan, “Environmental Law & Policy in India” Edn. 2nd Oxford University Press New Delhi

[2] States are – Gujarat, A.P., H.P., Bihar, Haryana, U.P. Manipur, M.P. and Bengal, Punjab and Rajasthan.

[3] A.K. Environmental Laws in India, 2006, Eastern Book Company

[4] U. Sankar, “Laws and institutions relating to environmental protection in India”, 1988

[5] P. Leelakrishnan, “Environmental Law in India” 2008 Edn. 3rd, Lexis Nexis Butterworth’s

[6] Divan, Rosencranz, “Environmental Law & Policy In India”, 2003, Edn. 2nd Oxford University Press.

[7] A.K. Environmental Laws in India, 2006, Eastern Book Company


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Updated On 2020-03-19T04:55:53+05:30
Subham Agrawal

Subham Agrawal

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