There are many reasons why someone might be deported from the United States. Among them, because the individual in question either entered the country illegally or stayed on even after their visa had expired. In other cases, people who are in the country legally may be deported because they disregarded the conditions specified by their visa. This happens… Read More »

There are many reasons why someone might be deported from the United States. Among them, because the individual in question either entered the country illegally or stayed on even after their visa had expired. In other cases, people who are in the country legally may be deported because they disregarded the conditions specified by their visa. This happens when a tourist gets a job, for example.

There are other reasons why people may face deportation, such as:

Violating immigration laws – This happens when people smuggle others that should not be here, or when someone gets married to help someone else get a visa.

Not Advising USCIS of an Address Change – When you have a green card and you move, you have ten days to let USCIS know your new address or may face deportation.

Getting public assistance – If within five years of the time you entered the country you become a public charge, then you may be deported, regardless of the visa you hold.

Committing a crime – Certain crimes result in deportation such as domestic violence, document fraud, money laundering, terrorism, rape, murder, and others.

Returning to the United States After Deportation

If you have been deported or have been notified that you will be, you may have to remain out of the country for a period that may range from five to twenty years. The worst-case scenario is that you will never be allowed to return.

However, you should not despair. Some people that have been deported may be able to return even before the expiration of their mandated time outside. To achieve this, it is important to understand the circumstances that lead to your removal, if you are a candidate for a waiver that would allow you to return, or if there are any other options available to you.

Was your removal ordered by an immigration judge?

If you do not know the answer to this question, then it is important that you find it. If you were told to go to a court hearing, then you might have been deported either because you did not show up, or as a result of the hearing. Maybe they told you that you could leave the country through a voluntary departure but you failed to leave and received an order of removal. The USCIS website will inform you of your particular circumstances. Then you should know the period of time that you have been ordered to remain outside the country.

Options for Return After Deportation

After being deported, returning to the U.S. may seem like an impossible task. You may reverse this complicated process through the help of an immigration lawyer that can explain your available options. You may discover that you can try to return through an immigrant visa sponsored by an employer or a family member. You might be able to return with a student visa or other non-immigrant visa.

In any case, it will be necessary for you to apply for a waiver that would in fact forgive your prior removal and authorize your reentry. Even for this small step, you may have to wait many years. Click here to learn more about your options if you or a loved one has been deported and wishes to return.


  1. Law Library: Notes and Study Material for LLB, LLM, Judiciary and Entrance Exams
  2. Legal Bites Academy – Ultimate Test Prep Destination
Updated On 2021-06-28T17:25:44+05:30
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