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Question: Explain Sampling Methods for Data Collection in Research. What are its advantages?Find the question and answer of the Research Methodology only on Legal Bites. [Explain Sampling Methods for Data Collection in Research. What are its advantages?]AnswerSampling is the process of choosing the group from which you will collect data for your research. Those individuals who make up a sample are taken from a larger population. With the help of sampling, you can test a statistical...

Question: Explain Sampling Methods for Data Collection in Research. What are its advantages?

Find the question and answer of the Research Methodology only on Legal Bites. [Explain Sampling Methods for Data Collection in Research. What are its advantages?]

Answer

Sampling is the process of choosing the group from which you will collect data for your research. Those individuals who make up a sample are taken from a larger population. With the help of sampling, you can test a statistical hypothesis on the traits of a population. In statistical analysis, sampling is the procedure by which researchers select a specific number of observations from a larger population. The sampling strategy will depend on the sort of study being done, although it may involve systematic sampling or just plain random sampling.

For instance: You could interview a sample of 100 students if you were examining the opinions of students at your university.

Advantages/Merits of Sampling

Everybody who has ever worked on a research project is aware that there are only a finite number of resources available at any given time. Because of this, the majority of research studies focus on gathering information from a sample of people rather than the full population (the census being one of the few exceptions). This is so that researchers can use sampling due to the following advantages:

Collection of Data that is appropriate for research

Sometimes the purpose of research is to gather a small amount of data from a large number of people (e.g., an opinion poll). Sometimes the objective is to gather a lot of data from a small number of individuals (e.g., a user study or ethnographic interview). In either case, sampling enables researchers to interview subjects in greater depth and collect richer data than contacting the entire population.

Saving of Time

It takes time to reach out to everyone in a population. Also, some persons will invariably not reply to the first attempt at contacting them, necessitating more time for researchers to follow up. A non-random sample is almost always obtained more quickly than random sampling, while random sampling is substantially slower than surveying the entire population. Hence, sampling helps researchers save a tonne of time.

Saving Money and Resources

The cost of the study is closely correlated with how many persons a researcher contacts. By enabling researchers to obtain the same results from samples as they would from the population, sampling helps researchers save money. Non-random sampling is much less expensive than random sampling since it incurs less expense in locating and obtaining participants for the data collection. Saving money is crucial because all research is done on a tight budget.

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Mayank Shekhar

Mayank Shekhar

Mayank is an alumnus of the prestigious Faculty of Law, Delhi University. Under his leadership, Legal Bites has been researching and developing resources through blogging, educational resources, competitions, and seminars.

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